Surf’s up

I’m now back from the most beautiful week of sun and sea in Maine and I’ve got surfing on the mind. I’ve only been back on home continental turf for less than two days- but how I could easily slip back into the curl of the ocean’s waves.

Not surprisingly, I’m interested in bodyboarding since I spent the week perfecting catching waves on Ogunquit Beach. Bodyboarding is easier to master than bodysurfing since you use the board to help catch the wave and ride its curl. Bodysurfing involves your body riding the wave with your head pointing facing down and your hands extending in front of you like an arrow as the wave propels you forward. Both are fun, and while I’m slowly picking up the tricks of the bodysurfing trade, bodyboarding is proving to be a lot of fun.

What’s your ocean sport of choice?

white boogie board

 

White boogie board via polyvore

A ruler among us

Since discovering earlier that Jordana has not one but six rulers, I thought I should share & show my own special ruler.

I, too, have more than one ruler but you’ll understand why this one is still kicking around: it’s a three-sided drafting ruler that belonged to my geologist dad. I inherited it since he no longer needs it (he no longers drafts but still has the drafting table… ahem office supplies hoarding, dad!) and as much as it is mildly confusing (to me) I can’t help but like its specificity and said handiness.

Ta-da! My ruler. I know, eh? It looks nothing like a ruler.

Now you get a better sense of it

The drafting ruler is made by Faber-Castell; the model number is indicated

and when I searched online I discovered that there are Faber-Castell

vintage drafting rulers for sale on Ebay! Who would have thought-? Mine is

definitely vintage but certainly not a fancy one

What makes this ruler special is that there are various ratio measurements

all along each side. So if you’re in school and you use the wrong side

to measure your algebra shapes you can kiss those homework marks goodbye.

You’ll find that each side offers two different sets of ratios running in the opposite

direction along the length, so there are six measurement scales in total (fyi)

I also like that the three colours along the sides are different:

red, forest green and black

Images courtesy of me.


Getaway car

Thinking of leaving it all behind for a summer escape? Why compromise on the comforts of home when you can take them on the road with you in this fabulous motor home by Vario?

Aptly named Perfect, this motor home model includes air conditioning, a full bathroom, luxurious finishes and – wait for it- a garage in the rear to take your Smart car with you. So when you do arrive at your destination you can park big daddy and slip away like an action film trick aboard your zippy compact wheels. So you never have to walk-!

It’s priced at $1.4 million, but really- who cares. It’s perfectly insane and I’d love to experience it.


At the cottage

This week I’m writing my White Wednesday post from our family’s beautiful cottage in the Haliburton Highlands, which is really just on the edge of Muskoka in Ontario. We’re on Livingstone Lake- a small, quiet lake near the quaint town of Dorset.

I came up here this week for a few days to relax and help out my dad who is building me a stunning canoe made from a cedar tree on our property that he cut and milled into cedar planks. The canoe has a ribbed interior that is now undergoing coats of clear varnish and its exterior is wrapped in a canvas that is coated with various fillers before being painted its final hue: a brilliant vermilion red! (My colour choice).

Today I share with you a few white things that caught my eye around here and give you a glimpse into the most special place in my life and the canoe that is nearly done.

There are all kinds of species of trees here, including birch (pictured above).

I quite like exploring clusters of trees, especially a magical spot where tall hemlock trees

create a very high canopy that prevents much underbrush from growing. Birch trees

let a lot of light through their leaves and many ferns and saplings grow underneath.

When you’re out on the Canadian Shield you’ll find lots of rocks

and since my dad is a geologist, rocks have always been in our viewfinder.

This is a piece of white granite that is a decoration in my stepmom’s garden bed.

These are the tips of kayak paddles. I grew up in cottage country in Québec and Ontario

and my dad is a perpetual sportsman, having always loved and sought adventure. He taught me how

to ‘Eskimo roll’ back in my early teens and we went down a river in kayaks when I was barely

barely 13 years old. We still have the kayaks and I paddled them last month.

Ta-da! Here is my canoe wrapped in canvas and coated in a white sealant.

It’s sitting like this under the deck drying for a few weeks and then

we’ll apply another coat of sealant

This is a closeup that shows the strokes of the paintbrush from coating the canvas

with white ‘stuff’ that has the effect of an egg shell finish, and the interior ribs sticking

out until they’re trimmed where the gunnels will be.

This is the can of filler that was brushed onto the canvas on the canoe

This is one end of the canoe and if you know your canoes, you’ll recognize the shape- it’s a Prospector.

This boat is slightly modified and built to be strong, fast and hold a good amount of camping gear.

Shifting, gears, we use a four-stroke motor to putter across the lake in an aluminum boat

during the in-between seasons when our regular ‘big’ boat is in storage for the winter.

I really like the type for this number four

This large buoy prevents us from accidentally scratching the hull of the boat

as we dock it. Not that we really *need* the bumpers but… just in case

Our cottage is off-grid and water-access, so learning how to tie knots is important.

Talk to seafaring folks and they’ll never call a rope a rope- it’s a ‘line’. A line can be used

for just about anything- I always keep one kicking around. I’ve been taught how

to tie a bowline knot but I always forget how, and this self-strengthening figure eight

is never quite right when I do it. My dad did this one when I arrived on Monday afternoon

and mine didn’t look nearly as nice.. so it’s not pictured

This is a danger warning sticker on the boat’s dashboard:

Warning! do not put your feet into the propeller. Ouch :S

I’ve been treated to beautiful sun and puffy white clouds this week.

I took this quick pic off the dock while looking for white stuff;

I’m hoping that when Jordana does make it up here for a visit she’ll

show me all the white things I’ve missed in today’s cottage tour for you all.

Happy summer, everyone!


The summer topper

Not all hats are created equal and today we’re featuring the ultimate in glam -yet practical- toppers.

The floppy extra-wide brim hat is lightweight due to its straw construction, and all that extra girth will provide the wearer with ample shade and a fun accessory whether you’re lounging by a fancy pool or heading to the beach for a day.

I’ve always wanted one and it’s looking like this will be my summer to pounce on this tireless classic. Looks great with any swim suit, a breezy maxi dress, or knee-length shorts for a day of urban exploration. We recommend it in white although the colours available are quite fun to coordinate with your suit- black, fuschia, and natural straw.

The Del Mar wide brim hat by sur la tête, $27 at Village Hat Shop


White cover

Isn’t it refreshing to see a beautiful knit all in white on the cover of a rather bid deal mag?

The stunning Lily Donaldson was photographed by Richard Bush wearing a Chanel spring 2012 dress for Vogue Russia’s July issue. I love the shape of this dress- architectural in shape with high texture value.

Happy White Wednesday, everybody! Stay cool!

Image courtesy of Vogue Russia


Big top

The Big Top of Cavalia’s Odysseo production in Toronto, Canada

In case you’re not living in Toronto or have passed through in the last month, you wouldn’t know that the city’s whiteness just went to new heights: the big top of Cavalia’s Odysseo show is here! (and you can still get tickets!)

The beautiful big white tent is the largest touring big top in the world and it is currently at the Toronto Port Lands on the city’s east side waterfront where each night, skilled performers and 61 horses create a spectacle combining music and acrobatics to make your childhood equine fantasies come true.

Many horse breeds are in the show. Image via Cavalia’s Odysseo

The big white tent is a sight to behold- I see it frequently from the Gardiner Expressway and I’m always admiring how lovely it is. The structure was conceived in Canada by set designer Marc Labelle, director Erick Villeneuve and Cirque du Soleil creator Normand Latourelle.

It is more than twice as large as the big top used for Cavalia’s original production and was designed with the help of the Italian firm Cannobio. The massive arches were built by Show Canada and the tent structure was manufactured in Italy. More than 60 people were involved in its creation process over the 11 months it took to finalize.

Big Top Facts

Dimensions: 125 high, covering an area of 393 feet long by 311 feet wide, which is more than 120,000 square feet.

Inside: A stage covering close to 8,200 square feet, no obstruction on stage or in the audience. Seating capacity: 2,290 people.

Assembly and transportation: Assembly requires more than 40 motors and a mechanical crane. The four arches are 88 feet high by 203 feet wide. 20 trucks are required to transport it all.

Below is a video of the assembly- amazing!